Monday, June 29, 2020

How Well Does the American Constitution Work - 1650 Words

How Well Does the American Constitution Work? (Other (Not Listed) Sample) Content: American Constitution NameProfessorInstitutionCourseDate IntroductionThe United States Constitution has played its role to a great impact in the several years and continues to do so up to date, regardless of having been written several hundred years ago. To meet this particular purpose of having an efficient Constitution requires having it drafted in such a way, its roles are vividly defined for governing a country and should have the elasticity to develop to meet new challenges and international transformations without having its founding principle changed in the progress. Nevertheless in today's' contemporary society, there are elements of the Constitution that some individuals highly believe are not completely fit in terms of dealing with new challenges facing the United States today, that may have not been considered in the past but now have become topics that must be dealt with. The United States currently is one of the world's most powerful as well as respected nations of the modern society is no longer an adolescent entity attempting to find its way in the world, but has grown over time into a sophisticated nation, whose economy is beyond comparison and is known as "the land of opportunity". It is vividly clear that a nation of such magnitude and size could have only been an aspiration at the time of the founding fathers. At the time at which the Constitution was drafted, the main issue was to run away from the European system of government at that time.The Democratic norms in the United StatesThere has been an historical view of the American democratic tradition with analytical overtones showing how democracy has transformed over the course of American history. The United States is a democracy. There is no doubt of that, but the American democratic tradition is largely something of a myth. First, a few clarification; the definition of democracy is asmajorityrule andminorityrights. Of these the second is more significant than the first. There are several despotisms which have majority rule. Hitler held plebiscites in which he obtained over 92 percent of the vote, and most of the people who were qualified to vote did vote. I think that in China today a majority of the people supports the government, but China is certainly not a democracy. The essential half of this definition then, is the second half, minority rights. What that means is that a minority has those rights which enable it to work within the system and to build itself up to be a majority and replace the governing majority. Moderate deviations from majority rule do not usually undermine democracy. In fact, absolute democracy does not really exist at the nation-state level. For example, a modest poll tax as a qualification for voting would be an infringement on the principle of majority rule but restrictions on the suffrage would have to go pretty far before they really abrogated democracy(Bessette Pitney, 2011). Another basic point, democracy is not the highest political value. Speeches about democracy and the democratic tradition might lead one to think this is the most perfect political system ever devised. That just is not true. There are other political values which are more important and urgent, security, for instance. And one would suggest that political stability and political responsibility are also more important. In deed, one would define a good government as a responsible government. In every society there is a structure of power. A government is responsible when its political processes reflect that power structure, thus ensuring that the power structure will never be able to overthrow the government. If a society in fact could be ruled by a minority because those in power had the authority to rule and the political system reflected that situation by giving governing power to the elite, then, it seems to me, we would have a responsible government even though it was not democratic. Now there are several features of dem ocracy that many individuals really do not know about. It is said, for instance, that government officials are elected by the voters, and the one that gets the most votes is elected. I would think this is misleading. The outcome of an election is not determined by those who vote, but by those who do not vote. Since 1945 or so, The United States has had pretty close elections, with not much more than half of the population voting. In the 1968 election almost 80 million voted, and almost 50 million citizens qualified to vote did not. The outcome was determined by the 50 million who did not vote. If one could have got 2 percent of the non-voters to the polls to vote for your candidate, you could have elected him. And that has been true of most of our recent elections. It's the ones who don't vote who determine the outcome (Hamilton, Madison Jay, 2013). Something else we tend to overlook is that the nomination process is much more important than the election process. I startle a lot o f my colleagues who think they know England pretty well by asking them how candidates for election are nominated in England. They don't have conventions or primary elections. So the important thing is who names the candidates. In any democratic country, if you could name the candidates of all parties, you wouldn't care who voted or how, because your man would be elected. So the nominations are more important than the elections.In the book Master of the Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson. At the heart of the book is its unprecedented revelation of how legislative power functions is in America, how the Senate works, and how Johnson, in his ascent to the presidency, mastered the Senate as no political leader before him had ever done. It was during these years that all Johnson's experience from his Texas Hill Country boyhood to his passionate representation in Congress of his hardscrabble constituents to his tireless construction of a political machine came to fruition. Caro introduces the story with a dramatic account of the Senate itself: how Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, and John C. Calhoun had made it the center of governmental energy, the forum in which the great issues of the country were thrashed out. And how, by the time Johnson arrived, it had dwindled into a body that merely responded to executive initiatives, all but impervious to the forces of change. Caro anatomizes the genius for political strategy and tactics by which, in an institution that had made the seniority system all-powerful for a century and more, Johnson became Majority Leader after only a single term, the youngest and greatest Senate Leader in our history; how he manipulated the Senate's hallowed rules and customs and the weaknesses and strengths of his colleagues to change the "unchangeable" Senate from a loose confederation of sovereign senators to a whirring legislative machine under his own iron-fisted control(Strunk, 2006). Caro demonstrates how Johnson's political genius enabled hi m to reconcile the irreconcilable: to retain the support of the southerners who controlled the Senate while earning the trust or at least the cooperation of the liberals, led by Paul Douglas and Hubert Humphrey, without whom he could not achieve his goal of winning the presidency. He shows the dark side of Johnson's ambition: how he proved his loyalty to the great oil barons who had financed his rise to power by ruthlessly destroying the career of the New Dealer who was in charge of regulating them, Federal Power Commission Chairman Leland Olds. And we watch him achieve the impossible: convincing southerners that although he was firmly in their camp as the anointed successor to their leader, Richard Russell, it was essential that they allow him to make some progress toward civil rights. In a breathtaking tour de force, Caro details Johnson's amazi... How Well Does the American Constitution Work - 1650 Words How Well Does the American Constitution Work? (Other (Not Listed) Sample) Content: American Constitution NameProfessorInstitutionCourseDate IntroductionThe United States Constitution has played its role to a great impact in the several years and continues to do so up to date, regardless of having been written several hundred years ago. To meet this particular purpose of having an efficient Constitution requires having it drafted in such a way, its roles are vividly defined for governing a country and should have the elasticity to develop to meet new challenges and international transformations without having its founding principle changed in the progress. Nevertheless in today's' contemporary society, there are elements of the Constitution that some individuals highly believe are not completely fit in terms of dealing with new challenges facing the United States today, that may have not been considered in the past but now have become topics that must be dealt with. The United States currently is one of the world's most powerful as well as respected nations of the modern society is no longer an adolescent entity attempting to find its way in the world, but has grown over time into a sophisticated nation, whose economy is beyond comparison and is known as "the land of opportunity". It is vividly clear that a nation of such magnitude and size could have only been an aspiration at the time of the founding fathers. At the time at which the Constitution was drafted, the main issue was to run away from the European system of government at that time.The Democratic norms in the United StatesThere has been an historical view of the American democratic tradition with analytical overtones showing how democracy has transformed over the course of American history. The United States is a democracy. There is no doubt of that, but the American democratic tradition is largely something of a myth. First, a few clarification; the definition of democracy is asmajorityrule andminorityrights. Of these the second is more significant than the first. There are several despotisms which have majority rule. Hitler held plebiscites in which he obtained over 92 percent of the vote, and most of the people who were qualified to vote did vote. I think that in China today a majority of the people supports the government, but China is certainly not a democracy. The essential half of this definition then, is the second half, minority rights. What that means is that a minority has those rights which enable it to work within the system and to build itself up to be a majority and replace the governing majority. Moderate deviations from majority rule do not usually undermine democracy. In fact, absolute democracy does not really exist at the nation-state level. For example, a modest poll tax as a qualification for voting would be an infringement on the principle of majority rule but restrictions on the suffrage would have to go pretty far before they really abrogated democracy(Bessette Pitney, 2011). Another basic point, democracy is not the highest political value. Speeches about democracy and the democratic tradition might lead one to think this is the most perfect political system ever devised. That just is not true. There are other political values which are more important and urgent, security, for instance. And one would suggest that political stability and political responsibility are also more important. In deed, one would define a good government as a responsible government. In every society there is a structure of power. A government is responsible when its political processes reflect that power structure, thus ensuring that the power structure will never be able to overthrow the government. If a society in fact could be ruled by a minority because those in power had the authority to rule and the political system reflected that situation by giving governing power to the elite, then, it seems to me, we would have a responsible government even though it was not democratic. Now there are several features of dem ocracy that many individuals really do not know about. It is said, for instance, that government officials are elected by the voters, and the one that gets the most votes is elected. I would think this is misleading. The outcome of an election is not determined by those who vote, but by those who do not vote. Since 1945 or so, The United States has had pretty close elections, with not much more than half of the population voting. In the 1968 election almost 80 million voted, and almost 50 million citizens qualified to vote did not. The outcome was determined by the 50 million who did not vote. If one could have got 2 percent of the non-voters to the polls to vote for your candidate, you could have elected him. And that has been true of most of our recent elections. It's the ones who don't vote who determine the outcome (Hamilton, Madison Jay, 2013). Something else we tend to overlook is that the nomination process is much more important than the election process. I startle a lot o f my colleagues who think they know England pretty well by asking them how candidates for election are nominated in England. They don't have conventions or primary elections. So the important thing is who names the candidates. In any democratic country, if you could name the candidates of all parties, you wouldn't care who voted or how, because your man would be elected. So the nominations are more important than the elections.In the book Master of the Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson. At the heart of the book is its unprecedented revelation of how legislative power functions is in America, how the Senate works, and how Johnson, in his ascent to the presidency, mastered the Senate as no political leader before him had ever done. It was during these years that all Johnson's experience from his Texas Hill Country boyhood to his passionate representation in Congress of his hardscrabble constituents to his tireless construction of a political machine came to fruition. Caro introduces the story with a dramatic account of the Senate itself: how Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, and John C. Calhoun had made it the center of governmental energy, the forum in which the great issues of the country were thrashed out. And how, by the time Johnson arrived, it had dwindled into a body that merely responded to executive initiatives, all but impervious to the forces of change. Caro anatomizes the genius for political strategy and tactics by which, in an institution that had made the seniority system all-powerful for a century and more, Johnson became Majority Leader after only a single term, the youngest and greatest Senate Leader in our history; how he manipulated the Senate's hallowed rules and customs and the weaknesses and strengths of his colleagues to change the "unchangeable" Senate from a loose confederation of sovereign senators to a whirring legislative machine under his own iron-fisted control(Strunk, 2006). Caro demonstrates how Johnson's political genius enabled hi m to reconcile the irreconcilable: to retain the support of the southerners who controlled the Senate while earning the trust or at least the cooperation of the liberals, led by Paul Douglas and Hubert Humphrey, without whom he could not achieve his goal of winning the presidency. He shows the dark side of Johnson's ambition: how he proved his loyalty to the great oil barons who had financed his rise to power by ruthlessly destroying the career of the New Dealer who was in charge of regulating them, Federal Power Commission Chairman Leland Olds. And we watch him achieve the impossible: convincing southerners that although he was firmly in their camp as the anointed successor to their leader, Richard Russell, it was essential that they allow him to make some progress toward civil rights. In a breathtaking tour de force, Caro details Johnson's amazi...

Tuesday, June 2, 2020

The Significance of Language Adaptation in Cisneros’ The House on Mango Street - Literature Essay Samples

The House on Mango Street written by Sandra Cisneros is a novel which raises many issues worth mentioning. This essay, however, discusses the importance of adapting to the new surroundings, especially to the use of language. Throughout the book the protagonist Esperanza tries to distance herself from her Hispanic tradition; she wants to escape Mango Street, misery, poverty, and Chicano community which damages women beyond repair. She wants to accomplish the â€Å"American Dream† and have the house of her own â€Å"like the houses on T.V.† The Mexican house on Mango Street is not it; she yearns for an American one. In her pursuit of doing that, she must choose one culture over the other. The same goes for language; Esperanza has to separate herself from her Hispanic roots and Spanish tongue, so she can truly free herself from Mango Street. Although Esperanza grew up in a Spanish-speaking community, she favors English language and voices a slight aversion to her culture. She implies this when she says, â€Å"In English my name means hope. In Spanish it means too many letters. It means sadness, it means waiting.† (Cisneros 10). The English meaning is positive and pleasant, whereas the Spanish one is gloomy and does not give her any hope. Characters in the novel are portrayed similarly; the ones who are bilingual are presented in a positive light when on the other hand the Spanish speaking individuals are sympathized or even made fun of (Betz 20). The vignette â€Å"Geraldo No Last Name† shows us of how little significance death of â€Å"just another wetback† is. Nameless Geraldo dies before anyone can identify him. Marin gets tired of describing what has happened and as well â€Å"cant explain why it mattered, the hours and hours, for somebody she didnt even know.† (Cisneros 66) It is explicitly shown how â€Å"[a]nonymity becomes a marker of one’s disposability† (Burcar 56). He was just â€Å"another brazer who didn’t speak English† (Cisneros 66). He did not matter and was yet one more stereotype of a migrant worker. He was not important enough for the doctor to be disturbed, as there was â€Å"[n]obody but an intern working all alone† (Cisneros 66). Since he does not speak English, Esperanza portrays him as a redundant human being. There is no translation of the word â€Å"brazer† and the readers consider the boy to be â€Å"just another foreign, distant object † (Betz 22). Cisneros in â€Å"No Speak English† shows us precisely just how important acculturation is. Everybody notices the arrival of â€Å"huge, enormous, beautiful† woman Mamacita, who soon becomes rather invisible. â€Å"Somebody said because she’s too fat, somebody because of the three flights of stairs, but I believe she doesn’t come out because she is afraid to speak English, and maybe this is so since she only knows eight words† (Cisneros 77). Mamacita due to her limited knowledge of English isolates herself and does not want to leave the apartment. Homesickness provoked by her â€Å"linguistic and geographic displacement† (Martin 63) makes her miserable and the desire to go back to her true home is tremendous. She does not belong and is not willing to assimilate, for she is afraid that with the use of the English language she will further distance herself from her culture and forget about her roots. The only connection with the Spanish language is the Spanish radio show, which she listens all the time, because even her husband yells at her in English. â€Å" ¡Ay, caray! We are home. This is home. Here I am and here I stay. Speak English. Speak English. Christ!† (Cisneros 78) Thus, Mamacita cannot find comfort in him, nor in her baby, who â€Å"starts to sing the Pepsi commercial he heard on TV† and consequently â€Å"breaks her heart† (Cisneros 78). Because of the loss of her â€Å"linguisti c identity† and â€Å"dislocat[ion] from her own house of memory, Mamacita has become another of the watching, waiting women of Mango Street† (Martin 63). In other words, she has lost the ability to express herself in the language she was raised which is the source of her anguish and alienation. The struggle of having to assimilate to the new language is also presented through Esperanza’s father. â€Å"My father says when he came to this country he ate hamandeggs for three months† (Cisneros 77). Not being able to speak English, he was forced to constantly eat the dish he did not even like. Although he had to learn the dominant language, the use of Spanish can be seen in â€Å"Papa who wakes up tired in the dark†. â€Å"Your abuelito is dead, Papa says early one morning in my room. Està ¡ muerto, and then as if he just heard the news himself, crumples like a coat and cries, my brave Papa cries† (Cisneros 56). Spanish words have an emotional connotation and display a certain level of intimacy in this particular event, as the father reaches for comfort in the familiarity of his native language. Betz notes that Esperanza sees her father as fragile because he decides to speak Spanish. He, like Geraldo and Mamacita, is a figure to be pitied (25). People of the community believe that they cannot leave Mango Street because of the language barrier, but once they accept and learn English, they are no longer limited and anything is possible. Compared to the first sections Esperanza towards the end of the novel uses less Spanish phrases, which may indicate that she successfully accomplishes her dream of moving away (Betz 22). To escape the barrio, poverty, and pursue the â€Å"American Dream† one must acquire English and accept it as it was a mother-tongue. The environment will not adapt to one’s needs, it is up to individual to adapt to it. Works Cited Betz, M. Regina. Chicana â€Å"Belonging† in Sandra Cisneros’ The House on Mango Street. Rocky Mountain Review, Special Issue, 2012, 18-33. Web. 29 April 2016 Burcar, Lilijana. American Literature and its Socio-Political Context. Ljubljana: Ljubljana University Press, 2014. Print. Cisneros, Sandra. The House on Mango Street. New York: Vintage Books, 1991. Print. Martin W., Karin. â€Å"The House (of Memory) on Mango Street: Sandra Cisneros’s Counter-Poetics of Space.† South Atlantic Review 73. 1 (Winter 2008): 50-67. JSTOR. Web. 29 April 2016

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Love Is The Beautiful And Sublime Love - 977 Words

Drawing from some of the authors that we looked at throughout the course of the semester, I was able to draw up my own concept of love. My concept of love includes that there are two different types of love and this idea is taken from Kant’s idea of love being beautiful and sublime and the fair sex and noble sex. The other author that presents two different types of love is Augustine, he presents the bodily and spiritual love and with these two concepts of love I was able to develop my own concept of love, that there are two different types one internal and one external. With the ideas that Kant and Augustine discuss about love I was able to draw parallels into our society and from my own personal experiences to draw my own concept and understanding of love. The first author Kant, presents the idea of the beautiful and sublime love. In this concept Kant says that the beautiful love is particular, sensational, feeling (emotions) while the sublime love is general, reason, deep understanding, geography, politics, industry, and government. Kant is basically stating that there are two types of love. Beautiful being that the love is more external, looking at one’s looks and what is on the outside, while the sublime love focuses more on the internal and spiritual connection of love, two having a connection where they are solely in love from the inside out, having a certain set of emotions/feelings towards one. Kant also goes on to talk about the fair and noble sex. The fair sex isShow MoreRelatedThe Sublime And The Beautiful1457 Words   |  6 Pageswritings on aesthetics such as 1756 A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful. In the Enquiry of the Sublime and the Beautiful, Edmund Burke explores the origins of our ideas of the sublime and the beautiful and separates each into their own respective rational categories. For Burke, the beautiful is that which is well formed and aesthetically pleasing, while the sublime (which Burke positions as being the trigger for the strongest of emotions one is capableRead MoreReflective Essay On The Sublime1247 Words   |  5 Pageswanted a purpose for the sublime, I wanted to know the value in experiencing it. And now that Kant created this dichotomy between beautiful and sublime, why would anyone ever choose the sublime? Beauty to me means joy, tranquility, and love, the sublime means confusion and fear. â€Å"[I]f you have the choice to just be happy, why pick anything else? I’m not saying, â€Å"Oh just be in a good mood†, I’m saying, why spend your limited time and energy seeking the bittersweet of the sublime?† I got a bit of an answerRead MoreEssay On The Nature Of Frankenstein1461 Words   |  6 Pagesheart† (Shelley, 39). McGavran argues that it is the fact that the creature is a physical representation of Victors sexuality that forces him to have to acknowledge his homosexual desire. McGavran points out that Victor had â€Å"selected his features as beautiful† (Shelley, 39) which means that â€Å"the creature has not always revolted his creator† (McGavran, 47). This reinforces both the idea of homosexual panic and McGavran’s argument that the creature represents his â€Å"ideal male lover† (47) as Shelley makesRead MoreThe Minds Of Humans Are Imperfect1121 Words   |  5 Pagesof fantasy or as a women of reality. There is a stark difference between the two groups of women, but sometimes they are so sublime that they may even jump between women of fantasy and those of reality. Dorotea, the rich peasant and wife of the nobleman Don Fernando, and Luscind a, a very wealthy women and wife to Cardenio, would fall explicitly into the category of sublime women which can transcend from reality to fantasy and work their way between either realm. Dulcinea and Aldonza Lorenza fallRead MoreWilliam Shakespeare s Three Sets Nature And The Romantics Are Two Sides Of The Same Coin1712 Words   |  7 PagesThe Sublime in Three Sets Nature and the Romantics are two sides of the same coin. In almost every single poem we have read over the course of this semester we have been able to find hints of the natural world. These instances were moments of hunger. While industrialization was tearing landscapes up by their roots, Romantic poets were desperate to experience the euphoric sense of sublimity they had come to associate with the highest level of consciousness. However, this sense of sublimity is notRead MoreThe Romantic Period Of William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, And Mary Shelley1451 Words   |  6 Pagespreoccupied the many different works and ideas of these Romantic poets and writers was the Romantic conception of sublime, or idea of being able to connect to one’s own experiences of awe and other emotions like those of terror or even danger. The writers and poets of the Romantic era would no doubt have been familiar with this concept. In fact, this the Romantic conception of sublime shows up repeatedly throughout Mary Shelley’s work, Frankenstein. Shelley is able to bring the idea of sublimity intoRead MoreFrankenstein : Underlying Tones Of Romanticism1279 Words   |  6 Pagesthemes and characteristics from the Romantic era are highlighted in the text. Romantic poets always seemed to capture the sublime moment and experience, comparing the beautiful to the grotesque and seeking to â€Å"express a new relationship to the imagination† (Fite 17). Victor Frankenstein’s quest to create a living creature out of scratch portrays a quest to achieve the sublime. His feelings about this undertaking also reflected the celebration and power of nature expressed by the writers of the RomanticRead MoreThe Feelings Of Nature And Man1614 Words   |  7 Pagescommunication to anyone. Thus, Mary Shelley shows Victor to the reader by describing his feelings through nature’s landscape, a major concern for the Romantic movement of the late-eighteenth and mid-ni neteenth-century Europe. Shelley employed the theme of sublime nature into the story to influence Victor was Shelly s job. Victor became affected by nature when the monster was created: The rain was pouring in torrents, and thick mists hid the summits of the mountains.(Ch10). Paralleling nature and human emotionRead MoreThe Great Writers From The Romantic Era1389 Words   |  6 Pagesevident that his definition of the sublime â€Å"mind to grasp at something towards which it can make approaches but which it is incapable of attaining† did in fact influence Mary Shelley’s writing of Frankenstein (Wordsworth, â€Å"From Enlightenment† 84) From the picturesque images of Mount Blanc and Lake Genva, to the frozen North Sea, it feels like Wordsworth’s hand is guiding Shelley’s pen as the foundation for the novel is laid down, and it is this presence of the sublime that makes Frankenstein the masterfulRead More Elements of Magical Realism and Sublime in Toads Mouth Essay1469 Words   |  6 PagesElements of Magical Realism and Sublime in Toads Mouth  Ã‚        Ã‚  Ã‚   Toads Mouth is a short story written by Isabel Allende in 1989. She has lived in Chili for most of her life, but she was born in Lima, Peru. Her father was a diplomat in Peru, but when her parents divorced, Allendes mother took her back to Santiago, Chili, to live with her grandparents. She wrote her first novel, The House of Spirits, around 1981. It became an international best seller. After reading Toads Mouth, I believe

Saturday, May 16, 2020

Medical Medicine Intake And Dosage Levels - 1040 Words

Introduction In general, a patient suffering from illness is prescribed medication by a doctor who is highly knowledgeable and experienced in the field of medicine. The doctor clearly specifies the medication process to the patient which includes the medicine information, medicine intake and dosage levels. There are instances where a patient without any proper consultation with the doctor gets medicines from the drug store and takes medication without any proper knowledge. This scenario is the most error prone as there is no proper administration. The outpatient medication without proper supervision can lead to many complications. Some of the problems include the following. 1. Irregular medicine intake, as the patient is not knowledgeable†¦show more content†¦Provide information of the medicine and also the intake directions. 3. Keeps track of the medicine intake, i.e. it maintains a record of the time the user has taken his medicine. 4. Scrutinizes the medicine stock. It looks after the medicine stock and intimates the patient about the medicine. I will go through all the software development life cycles and develop the application. The application is a medicine schedule and alert system as an example of large scale of software development. The following are the six phases involved in every software development life cycle. 1. Requirements gathering and analysis. 2. Design. 3. Implementation or coding. 4. Testing. 5. Deployment. 6. Maintenance. In the requirements gathering and analysis phase, requirements are gathered in this phase and are analyzed for their validity. A document is created which served as strategies for the next phases. In the design phase, system and software design is prepared from the requirements gathered in the requirements and analysis phase. Implementation or coding phase is the longest phase. In this phase, the coding part is started for the system which is to be developed. The work in this phase is divided into modules or units. Each module is separately coded by the developers. In testing phase, the code from the coding phase is tested against the requirements gathered in the requirements and analysis phase. In this phase the following tests are done on the system. 1. Unit testing. 2. Integration

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Importance of Educating Jail and Prison Inmates Essay

Summary This paper explores the benefits provided by educational programs in jails and prisons. Included are the reasons inmates need education in order to successfully reenter society once they are released and use the knowledge and skills they have learned to obtain a job in order to support themselves and their families. Also examined in the paper are the financial benefits of incorporating educational programs instead of cutting them, as well as the effect these programs play on the recidivism rate. Lastly is a focus on understanding the importance of education and job training, even though the recipients are criminals. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ A†¦show more content†¦In a report from Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative, Steurer, Linton, Nally and Lockwood (2010) found that 94% of state and federal inmates recognized education as the top personal reentry tool they needed before being released (p. 41). Inmates clearly understand the importance of education in their success once they are released, and it is time to provide them with the skills they need while they are incarcerated. According to Pam Levan, an adult education teacher in the Laporte County area for over twenty years, †They [inmates] didn’t have enough basic education to know they shouldn’t do certain things that would lead them to prison, or even know the difference between right and wrong† (personal communication, December 2, 2013). Not only are inmates lacking school education resulting in a high school or college diploma, but many also lack common knowledge on what they should and should not do in societ y. Many inmates grew up in a family and/or neighborhood that did not teach them right from wrong but rather reinforced a life of crime. Education is the key to decreasing the cycle of crime because it allows inmates to learn from their mistakes and have a better chance at a life without crime upon their release. In order to support themselves and their families, it is crucial inmates find a job upon their release. Without atShow MoreRelatedCollege Education For The United States873 Words   |  4 PagesCollege Education for Inmates A contentious issue in the criminal justice field is whether or not free college education should be provided to inmates while they are incarcerated. While some might argue that taxpayers should not be forced to fund these types of programs, others agree that it is extremely beneficial to not only the inmates but also the taxpayers as well. Not only are the inmates the kind of people in society who need education the most, but studies have shown a significant decreaseRead MoreIncarceration Of The United States1113 Words   |  5 PagesFrom 1990 - 2000 the prison population increased by 1,000,000. The main reason for incarceration as a punishment in this country is rehabilitation, or so we have been told. In recent years an industry has developed that revolves around high incarceration rates and lengthy sentences, needless to say business is booming. The for-profit prison industry now makes millions off the backs of American inmates their families and every American taxpayer. The two largest for-profit prison corporations today areRead MoreYou Are Going For Prison By Jim Hogshire Essay919 Words   |  4 PagesYou Are Going To Prison Book Review The United States has the largest population of prisoners of any nation in the world. As of 2013 there were more than 1.57 million inmates in jails and prisons throughout the U.S.(The United States) In the book You Are Going To Prison, by Jim Hogshire, a verbal picture is painted of the life of a prisoner. Published in 1994 by the publishing company Loompanics Unlimited, this book talks about the experience of being incarcerated from the time you are stopped byRead MoreThe Impact Of Mental Illnesses . Mental Illnesses Have1557 Words   |  7 Pagesdeinstitutionalization, prisons and jails have supplanted public psychiatric hospitals as institutions of social control of the mentally ill .† (Markowitz 2011). Since this change, our prison systems have taken in a lot of these people, â€Å"it is estimated that there are now more than three times as many persons with mental illness in jails and prisons than in psychiatric hospital. . . The most recent study puts the estimate of the percentage of inmates with a history of mental health problems in jails at 64%Read MorePrison Education Essay4573 Words   |  19 PagesUndergraduate Research (NCUR) 2009 University of Wisconsin La-Crosse La-Crosse, Wisconsin April 16 - 18, 2009 Prison Culture, Education, and Recidivism Rates Caleb L. Fry and Lauren T. Rios Department of Anthropology Lake Tahoe Community College One College Drive South Lake Tahoe, California 96150 USA Faculty Advisor: Daryl G. Frazetti Abstract Given the number of inmates in the prison system and the high level of recidivism, it is important to seek out possible solutions to this growing problemRead MoreThe Role of Human Service Professionals2387 Words   |  10 PagesAbstract The Human Service Professionals are a group of individuals whose job is specifically to serve the society, educate them and work for the societal welfare at large. In the twentieth century, organizational ethics have gained immense importance in the corporate world. The need to adhere to ethical standards is even greater for the human service professionals and those who educate them. This is because any deviance from ethical standards can question the integrity of human service professionsRead MoreThe Social Problem Of Mass Incarceration Of Minority Groups1753 Words   |  8 Pagesarticle Mauer provides readers with a list of recommendations on what could be done to essentially level the playing field for all races when it comes to mass incarceration. Mauer believes that the lack of resources for minority groups once out of prison is astounding and if more reentry programs were developed less reoccurring arrests would happen. He also states that investing in high school completion will lower the levels of incarceration amongst the African American communities because thereRead MoreJuvenile Justice : Helping Or Hurting The Future Generations Of America3014 Words   |  13 Pagesthe way in the effort to decrease the number of children processed through the courts is the State of Georgia, recent legislation of which has drastically reduced the number of juveniles incarcerated by an amazing rate. This paper will analyze the importance of continuing this trend of a lower rate of juvenile arrests and incarceration by moving away from the practices in effect in the United States during the twentieth century that created the unsustainable increase in same; an exploration of whetherRead MoreInside the Criminal Justice System3054 Words   |  12 Pagesinclude many flaws and issues that require a criminal justice practitioner to be ethical. This meaning that there should be restrictions on how a punishment is placed and whether it is just or not? The functioning, safe ty and the conditions of the prisons and the way the prisoners are treated also need to be reviewed. If the functions are observed on the institutional level, then the fairness at work and a safe working environment needs to be looked into as well. All these things would be carried outRead MoreEssay on The Death Penalty6909 Words   |  28 Pagesare five methods of execution; the most common procedures used are lethal injection, electrocution and lethal gas. What we do know about the death penalty is that the average inmate spends 13 to25 years on death row before a final decision is made (USA Today 2012); it is more expensive to house a death row inmate than an inmate serving L.W.O.P. (Life without the possibility of parole) and the two states that conduct the most executions are Texas and Virginia. What we don’t know about the death penalty

Marcel Duchamp, Fountain - 1213 Words

Marcel Duchamp | Fountain â€Å"All in all, the creative act is not performed by the artist alone; the spectator brings the work in contact with the external world by deciphering and interpreting its inner qualification ..† Do you know, which artist could have said this? That was a citation of Marcel Duchamp, one of the most important artists of the 20th century. In the next few minutes I will give you some informations about the person, who said this quite interesting words. Duchamp‘s life Marcel Duchamp was a French Painter, Object-Artist and Media-performer. Henri-Robert-Marcel Duchamp was born on the 28th July, 1887 in Blainville-Crevon in north-west France and he died in 1968. He was the son of an well-to-do family. His father†¦show more content†¦Duchamp’s readymades are often coincided with Dada, but they are not really Dada. He insisted, that this aspect of his work was parallel, but not directly influenced by Dada. Étant donnà ©s (1946-1966) Étant donnà ©s is Duchamp‘s last major work. It was produced in secrecy over 20 years. Étant donnà ©s may therefore be considered to be Duchamp‘s artistic testament, his conclusion to art. The work presents the viewer with a massive wooden door. If you examine it closely, you will find two peepholes. Behind the door is a picture, in which you can see a naked woman lyingin the grass. In this work for example you can see surrealistic features. Ready-mades – Definition Coined by Duchamp, the term „Ready-madeâ€Å" came to designate mass-produced everyday objects taken out of their usual context and raised to the status of artworks by the mere choice of the artist. A performative act as much as a stylistic category, the readymade had far-reaching effect for what can legitimately be considered an object of art. Fountain The Fountain is one of his first and most notorious Ready-mades and it is one of Duchamp‘s most famous work of art, although it is also a very controversial piece of art. It is a urinal placed on it‘s back, an American averageShow MoreRelatedThe School Of Athens And Marcel Duchamp s Fountain904 Words   |  4 Pagesthe Impressionism brought in the 19th century. After that, many other movements came to exist, each vastly different than the last, and in the future more will see the light of day. Consequently, both Raphael’s â€Å" The School of Athens† and Marcel Duchamp’s â€Å"Fountain† are both considered great works of art, regardless of the fact that those two pieces are nothing alike. Therefore, under certain circumstances, the illegality of painting on public or privately own spaces does not diminish the artisticRead MoreThe Controversy of Marcel Duchamp Essay855 Words   |  4 Pagesworld, Marcel Duchamp changed the way we look at and p roduce art today. Marcel Duchamp was by far, one of the most controversial figures in art. Two of the most well known and talked about pieces by him are The Fountain and The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even . Duchamp created many other pieces that caught the attention of critics, other artists, and the population in a negative way; however, these two pieces alone, brought about the greatest amount of controversy. In 1917, Marcel DuchampRead MoreGeorge Benjamin Luks : A New York City1437 Words   |  6 Pagesshowed less interest in the significance of things and more in emotion and life (ART, POSTMODERN CRITICISM, AND THE EMERGING INTEGRAL MOVEMENT), Artist such as Marcel Duchamp were influenced to further push the concepts of art.. Duchamp was a modern artist from northern France that often used brushes to create art (Camfield). In 1913 Duchamp began experimenting with a new concept of art called readymade. His first creation was called the Bicycle Wheel. This type of artist style was coined as beingRead MoreReadymade Art Essay1113 Words   |  5 Pageswas introduced by Marcel Duchamp when he took an ordinary snow shovel and painted the title In advance of the broken arm. He had previously turned a wheel up-side down and attached it to a stool, creating a piece he called Bicycle wheel. This was also considered a â€Å"readymade.† A â€Å"readymade† by Duchamp is â€Å"an ordinary object elevated to the dignity of a work of art by the mere choice of an artist.† Duchamp produced many of these â€Å"readymades,† but it his readymade entitled Fountain that we will be discussingRead MoreMarcel Duchamp And John Cage1574 Words   |  7 Pagesrevolutionary artists, Marcel Duchamp and J ohn Cage still play a significant role in contemporary art practice and theory today. During the early 20th century, Marcel Duchamp was influenced by the emerging artistic movements such as Dada and Cubism. He experimented with Cubism briefly and attempted to capture time and motion in a cubist style painting. He endeavoured to â€Å"detheorize’ Cubism in order to give it a freer interpretation’. Inspired by his time lapse photography, Duchamp painted ‘Nude descendingRead MoreMarcel Duchamp’s Fountain Essay1784 Words   |  8 PagesMarcel Duchamp’s Fountain by Sarah Shea HUMN406-01 Professor Nelson Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain People often ask what constitutes good art. Who decides whether or not a piece is art and whether it is good art or not? Marcel Duchamp challenged popular notions of his day about what art actually is. Duchamp, a French artist living in New York at the turn of the century, believed that it was up to the artist to determine what art is. Duchamp is most famous for a type of sculpture he created calledRead MoreDadaism Art763 Words   |  4 Pagesperson looking at the art. The three Dada artists that stick out to me the most are Marcel Duchamp, Theo Van Doesburg, and Francis Picabia. Marcel Duchamp was raised in a family of artists which influenced him to become an artist. Eventually Duchamp got older and he went to Paris to studied Cubism, Fauvism, and Impressionism. At the age of 25 he met an earlier Dadaism artist, Francis Picabia. A year later Duchamp and Picabia attended a theater adaptation of Raymond Roussel’s Impressions dAfriqueRead MoreThe Impact Of Wwi For Artists Paul Nash And Marcel Duchamp Essay1049 Words   |  5 PagesResearch Essay Impact of †¨WWI for artists-Paul Nash and Marcel Duchamp As a number of leading artists got involved in the War, most of the art campaigns stopped. Individual artistic creations became less radical and started to step down from abstraction to concrete representations. In particular, the program in which the government appointed the artists as war correspondents has resulted in some of the most exceptional artworks of this century. This is, perhaps, because the artists have been exposedRead MoreA Range Of Artists And Their Works2006 Words   |  9 Pagestremor initiated by Marcel Duchamp, resulted in the subsequent events that would path the way to make him perhaps the most instrumental artist of the twenty-century. Duchamp was an innovator of the Dada movement, in which challenged long-held conventions about what art should be, and how it should be made. Pursuing an alternative to expressing objects in paint, Duchamp began displaying mass-produced, commercially available, quotidian objects he referred to as â€Å"ready-mades†. Duch amp set out to shockRead MoreCommentary On The History Of Communication Design788 Words   |  4 Pagesperfectly within the Dada movement, considering the rebellious nature of the Dadaists., it served to remove memories of the past which previously had been art’s intention. The first image I propose for the exhibition is of Marcel Duchamp’s 1917 ‘readymade’ Fountain. Fountain is perhaps Duchamp’s most famous work and one of the defining pieces of art from the 20th century. In 1917, to have a urinal, lay flat with only a signature was certainly not considered ‘art’. It was the most famous of Duchamp’s

A Blessing free essay sample

This poem makes me feel happy and delighted. Although out of everything in the poem my favorite part is the beginning. The begging is the best part because it has lots of imagery and just brightens my mood in general. My mood is brought up by the poem because of how happy the tone Wright uses. â€Å"A Blessing† also made me think about the simple free pleasures in our life that are left invisible. â€Å"Twilight bounds softly forth on the grass, and the eyes of those two Indian ponies,† is a part from the poem that I think is the strongest. The few lines from the poem introduces what the whole poem is going to be about. Also it just gives me a picture of peace and starts to show me what the poem is going to be about Although overall after reading the poem yes, I enjoy and like the poem â€Å"A Blessing† poem as a whole. We will write a custom essay sample on A Blessing or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page â€Å"A Blessing† just brings out the sun on a rainy day. For an example when I was reading the poem my mood might not have been all that great but the poem helped. Also I might now have realized before that some of the simple pleasures are just left un-seen. Sometimes people might not have money to go on vacations; but just think about that. In the poem for an example getting such a pleasure out of the ponies was completely free. The poem made me realize that there are no excuses to ignore the simple pleasures. In life there is no reason to ignore the simple pleasures because they might even be as special as a blessing. Also this poem made me see in my mind a quiet highway with just a single man and a few ponies on a spring day. This is because of all the imagery that makes me feel as happy as a child on Christmas.